Early Replication and Host Response Characteristics Derived from the Parental Swine Strains Determine the 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Phenotype

04/19/2012 11:00
04/19/2012 12:00
America/New York
Professor Paul G. Thomas from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (Memphis, TN) will give a seminar at MSSM on April 19, 2012 at 11 AM.

Click here for curriculum vitae

Location: Annenberg 20-01

Title: Early Replication and Host Response Characteristics Derived from the Parental Swine Strains Determine the 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Phenotype.


Abstract:

The recent 2009 Swine-origin Influenza (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) is a reassortant between two swine influenza strains circulating in North America and Eurasia. Virus growth and host response characteristics have been compared by systems level analysis of differentiated human airway epithelial cells infected with different S-OIV isolates, the two parent strains and a seasonal influenza variant. By all measures, the S-OIVs replicate more rapidly than the parental swine and seasonal strains. However, despite the higher growth and greater spreading efficiency of the S-OIVs conferred by the NA and M genes of the Eurasian lineage virus, the pandemic strains retain the American swine virus characteristic of attenuated and delayed transcription of antiviral host genes. The greater fitness of the S-OIVs in human cells derives from two properties contributed independently by each parent strain: enhanced immune evasion and capacity for rapid growth during the first two rounds of replication.